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How Far Can You Drive Your Vehicle on Empty?
Topic Started: Sep 14 2016, 11:29 AM (1,040 Views)
Demagogue
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Every driver occasionally lets their gas tank get low enough to trigger the low fuel warning light. Even though we all know to ideally refill before letting the tank reach ¼, we still let it run low from time to time. Knowing how far you can drive on an empty gas tank will help keep you from getting stranded on the side of the road.

Before letting your car run on empty again, it’s worth knowing just how many – or how few – miles you can actually drive after the light comes on. It’s also smart to know what else is at stake when you let your gas tank run to near depletion.

Part 1 of 3: Is it dangerous to drive with the low fuel warning light illuminated?

The primary concern when driving on empty is the possibility of running out of gas and getting stuck on the road, which is not only a hassle, but also a potentially dangerous situation. You may break down on the freeway, where the surrounding cars are traveling upwards of 70 MPH, or you may break down on a blind turn on the highway, where a vehicle could rear end you.

That said, driving on empty can also do damage to your vehicle. If you do run out of gas, you can do damage to your catalytic converter, which may then need to be repaired or replaced. Even the simple act of driving with a low amount of fuel in your tank can damage your fuel pump, as any debris or contamination in the gas (which naturally settles at the bottom of the tank), will be sent through your fuel pump when the tank is nearly empty.

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People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would do them harm.
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Demagogue
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I would never recommend getting too far below 1/4 tank of fuel but it is interesting that someone did the work to figure this out.
People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would do them harm.
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wilmywood8455
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Getting below 1/4 tank is bad for your electric fuel pump also, as it relies on fuel to keep it cool.
I thought as I got older, I would learn wisdom and patience, but the only thing I have learned so far is that I don't give a damn.
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Coast2coast

How Far Can You Drive Your Vehicle on Empty?

Up hill or down?

:nana:

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Coast2coast

The tanks at the station gather crap on the bottom as well. I don't go in to fill up if I see the tanker there offloading and stirring up everything in the station's tanks.

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thoughtless
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My dad was a farmer, and carried a 55 gallon drum of gasoline with a hand pump in the back of his truck. He would drive until he ran out of gas, then pump in a couple of gallons, then repeat, over and over.

I was driving his truck one day, and ran out of gas. The two gallons at a time thing never made sense to me, so I decided to fill the tank. That's when I discovered that the top of the gas tank was rusted out, and wouldn't hold gas.

That was in a '59 F150. It's hard to believe, but the gas tank was inside the cab, behind the seat. What's harder to believe is that I drove that truck with raw gasoline puddles on the floorboard.
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Coast2coast

I had a car once back in the day that I could not fill due to a leak at the top somewhere around the inlet pipe.

But if you liked the smell of gasoline fumes than fill-er-up!
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ringotuna
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thoughtless
Sep 15 2016, 11:39 AM
My dad was a farmer, and carried a 55 gallon drum of gasoline with a hand pump in the back of his truck. He would drive until he ran out of gas, then pump in a couple of gallons, then repeat, over and over.

I was driving his truck one day, and ran out of gas. The two gallons at a time thing never made sense to me, so I decided to fill the tank. That's when I discovered that the top of the gas tank was rusted out, and wouldn't hold gas.

That was in a '59 F150. It's hard to believe, but the gas tank was inside the cab, behind the seat. What's harder to believe is that I drove that truck with raw gasoline puddles on the floorboard.
:lol:
"Tell them you're a Muslim..Tell them you're a Muslim": Nancy Pelosi LOL
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70-101
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thoughtless
Sep 15 2016, 11:39 AM
My dad was a farmer, and carried a 55 gallon drum of gasoline with a hand pump in the back of his truck. He would drive until he ran out of gas, then pump in a couple of gallons, then repeat, over and over.

I was driving his truck one day, and ran out of gas. The two gallons at a time thing never made sense to me, so I decided to fill the tank. That's when I discovered that the top of the gas tank was rusted out, and wouldn't hold gas.

That was in a '59 F150. It's hard to believe, but the gas tank was inside the cab, behind the seat. What's harder to believe is that I drove that truck with raw gasoline puddles on the floorboard.
Gas tanks behind seats were common in pickup trucks until about 1973.
"We should not confuse populism with popularity" - R. Wolffe
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wilmywood8455
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Wasn't it a gas tank in cab that dateline did the expose on way back? Or was that underneath but outside the frame rails?
I thought as I got older, I would learn wisdom and patience, but the only thing I have learned so far is that I don't give a damn.
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70-101
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wilmywood8455
Sep 17 2016, 10:10 AM
Wasn't it a gas tank in cab that dateline did the expose on way back? Or was that underneath but outside the frame rails?
Do you mean the 1993 Dateline NBC report titled ”Waiting to Explode” that questioned the safety of some General Motors trucks?
"We should not confuse populism with popularity" - R. Wolffe
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wilmywood8455
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Yes.
I thought as I got older, I would learn wisdom and patience, but the only thing I have learned so far is that I don't give a damn.
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70-101
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Fuel tanks on 80's and early 90s Chevrolet C/K-Series pickup's had side mounted fuel tanks that were outside the frame rails. From a safety standpoint, that was a worse location for a fuel tank then behind the driver's seat.

But besides that, it was a staged event about the Chevrolet C/K Series pickup's allegedly exploding upon impact during accidents due to the poor design of side mounted fuel tanks. It was a staged event that cost NBC dearly in court. While it also humiliated the network brass for years to come. I'm not sure NBC ever fully recovered from that - because it was a serious enough transgression of the public trust that several careers were ruined and about eight people at NBC lost their jobs including NBC's president Mike Gardner - who signed off on the staged event.

Edited by 70-101, Sep 17 2016, 08:13 PM.
"We should not confuse populism with popularity" - R. Wolffe
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Coast2coast

I restored a '68 Chevy Impala Four Door. 327 - Four Barrel (Loved that car)

The original owner only would buy Chevy's. This particular rolling lounge he would use for his families trips. He rid the car of it's factory issued gas tank and put in a 48 gallon tank.

I s--t you not!

I only filled it twice. Even full that machine could still go up hill, accelerate up hill and not breathe hard.
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70-101
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Coast2coast
Sep 17 2016, 09:26 PM
I restored a '68 Chevy Impala Four Door. 327 - Four Barrel (Loved that car)

The original owner only would buy Chevy's. This particular rolling lounge he would use for his families trips. He rid the car of it's factory issued gas tank and put in a 48 gallon tank.

I s--t you not!

I only filled it twice. Even full that machine could still go up hill, accelerate up hill and not breathe hard.
Was this a custom made 48- gallon tank, because as far as I know the largest factory tank on a GM car was the 36-gallon tank from a 1963 Corvette ZO6 'tanker'. Which I believe is also the most valuable Corvette on the planet. Where in 62 -63 Chevy's 'Special Performance Group' took 199 cars and gave them given the Z06 option in 1963 and only 63 are known to have had the large 36-gallon tank. And that's the key here - the legendary 36-gallon fuel tank, designed only for long distance racing.


The 63 Z06 'tanker' had an L84 fuel-injected solid lifter 360 hp engine mated to an M-21 close ratio four-speed 'Muncie', which was also a first because Chevy just opened it's new Muncie Indiana transmission plant in 63. The M21 was the first four-speed built at GM's Muncie Indiana transmission plant. A few years later that Muncie plant would build was likely the best transmission ever built the M-22 Rock Crusher - so named for its amazing strength and reliability.The only weak spot on the car was the drum brakes - but it did have dual master cylinders, for safety reasons. The car was designed by Zora Duntov the father of the Corvette & Larry Shinoda, the father of the Boss Mustang.

Now how's that for good company. :cheers:
"We should not confuse populism with popularity" - R. Wolffe
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Coast2coast

70-101
Sep 17 2016, 10:27 PM
Coast2coast
Sep 17 2016, 09:26 PM
I restored a '68 Chevy Impala Four Door. 327 - Four Barrel (Loved that car)

The original owner only would buy Chevy's. This particular rolling lounge he would use for his families trips. He rid the car of it's factory issued gas tank and put in a 48 gallon tank.

I s--t you not!

I only filled it twice. Even full that machine could still go up hill, accelerate up hill and not breathe hard.
Was this a custom made 48- gallon tank, because as far as I know the largest factory tank on a GM car was the 36-gallon tank from a 1963 Corvette ZO6 'tanker'. Which I believe is also the most valuable Corvette on the planet. Where in 62 -63 Chevy's 'Special Performance Group' took 199 cars and gave them given the Z06 option in 1963 and only 63 are known to have had the large 36-gallon tank. And that's the key here - the legendary 36-gallon fuel tank, designed only for long distance racing.


The 63 Z06 'tanker' had an L84 fuel-injected solid lifter 360 hp engine mated to an M-21 close ratio four-speed 'Muncie', which was also a first because Chevy just opened it's new Muncie Indiana transmission plant in 63. The M21 was the first four-speed built at GM's Muncie Indiana transmission plant. A few years later that Muncie plant would build was likely the best transmission ever built the M-22 Rock Crusher - so named for its amazing strength and reliability.The only weak spot on the car was the drum brakes - but it did have dual master cylinders, for safety reasons. The car was designed by Zora Duntov the father of the Corvette & Larry Shinoda, the father of the Boss Mustang.

Now how's that for good company. :cheers:
I like that club! :)

Impressive knowledge you have there. Reminds me of the movie "My Cousin Vinny" where Marisa Tomei takes the stand.

It must have been a custom. He had also built a huge protective cover for it as well. I used to love telling station attendants about it because they were always skeptical until they looked underneath and then it was always comments along the line of "Wow! That's crazy!"

I miss that car.



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70-101
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Marisa Tomei :love:



"We should not confuse populism with popularity" - R. Wolffe
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Coast2coast

70-101
Sep 18 2016, 03:41 PM
Marisa Tomei :love:



I know! :hooray:

(Oops! The Missus!) :'(






:biggrin:

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Demagogue
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Coast2coast
Sep 18 2016, 04:13 PM
70-101
Sep 18 2016, 03:41 PM
Marisa Tomei :love:



I know! :hooray:

(Oops! The Missus!) :'(






:biggrin:

I will just leave this right here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nGQLQF1b6I
People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to visit violence on those who would do them harm.
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